Be Bold with your Greens: Benefits of Collard Greens

Be Bold with your Greens: Benefits of Collard Greens

Collard greens are a traditional side dish in the south, and Southerners might be onto something. Not only do collard greens supply good doses of protein, fiber, calcium and iron, but the leafy green vegetables also provide more impressive amounts of other key vitamins and minerals.

Collard greens contain 771 micrograms of vitamin A and 34.6 milligrams of vitamin C per 1-cup serving. These antioxidants help to lower the risk of oxidative stress on your cells, which is cell damage that can occur when your nutrient intake is low and when toxic chemicals and environmental pollutants enter your body. Collards also contain 5 grams of fiber per cup and can support the health of your digestive system when consumed regularly.

Intake of collard greens has long been known to have the capacity to lower blood cholesterol levels, including blood levels of LDL cholesterol. What you may not know is that we get unique health benefits from collard greens in the form of cancer protection. The cancer-preventive properties of collard greens may be largely related to four specific glucosinolates found in this cruciferous vegetable. Each of these glucosinolates can be converted into a corresponding isothiocyanate (ITC) that can help lower our cancer risk by supporting our body’s detox and anti-inflammatory systems.

You’ll want to include collard greens as one of the cruciferous vegetables you eat on a regular basis if you want to receive the fantastic health benefits provided by the cruciferous vegetable family. Cooked collard greens don’t need to be limp and dull; prepared correctly, collard greens can be tasty in addition to being nutritious. Chop collard greens into small, even pieces to ensure that they cook evenly. Steam collards for 10 minutes or less to retain their nutrients and season them with peppers, chopped onions and your favorite herbs and spices. It is very important not to overcook collard greens. Like other cruciferous vegetables overcooked collard greens will begin to emit the unpleasant sulfur smell associated with overcooking.

Please visit our website for more information on this and other great health topics. Remember this article is for information only. Do not make any changes in your diet or lifestyle without first consulting with your preventive health care provider. We always pray for your prosperity and health, 3 John 2, blessings, Donna.


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